Archives for posts with tag: technology

An internet blackout by some of the internet heavyweights is looking much more likely. Mashable, one of the biggest tech websites out there, published an editorial calling for a campaign to inform the masses about the danger posed by SOPA.

Facebook, Google and Wikipedia. You’re the Big Three in this fight. You’ve already publicly affirmed your opposition to SOPA. Now it’s time to really be a part of the fight.

Everyone in the tech community knows about SOPA, but that isn’t enough – the anti-SOPA movement needs the average Joe to understand and protest against the bill.

A blackout of Facebook, Google and Wikipedia would get the world talking. It would be on the frontpage of newspapers (except possibly the SOPA supporting Murdoch press). People will ask ‘what is it about SOPA that causes these internet behemoths to take such drastic action?’

January 18th is the date set by members of online community Reddit for the blackout. Hacktivist collective Anonymous have tweeted that they will embark on radio silence on that day, and Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales has stated that he hopes Wikipedia will be ready to get involved:

I’m all in favor of it [a January 18 blackout of Wikipedia], and I think it would be great if we could act quickly to coordinate with Reddit. I’d like to talk to our government affairs advisor to see if they agree on this as useful timing, but assuming that’s a greenlight, I think that matching what Reddit does (but in our own way of course)[…]

Of course, we really need Google to get involved. After all, ‘Don’t be evil’ is their informal corporate motto. They have stepped up to the mark before by removing Google search capabilities from China, now we have to hope they are prepared to step up again.

The SOPA bill is the desperate bite of a wounded and dying entertainment industry. The internet has liberated artists and content providers. We are seeing the emergence of an organic internet marketplace, free from the layers of middlemen that have exploited artists for so long. They have been creaming money of the work of others for so long that they think what they do is natural.

January 18th is set to be an important day for the internet. How important is up to the big three.

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Today offered a glimpse of a truly amazing future for conscientious shoppers that want to boycott products.

A team of anti-SOPA activists (read about the Stop Online Piracy Act here) have created an app that allows you to scan a barcode from a product and see whether the product is made by one of the 800 SOPA supporting companies.

It works by automatically checking a product against a database of companies. If the scanned product  comes from a SOPA supporting company, then a big red ‘x’ is displayed on the screen – enabling the shopper to chose not to purchase.

The idea behind the boycott app is brilliant and could be applied to anything. Simply change the list of companies in the database to whoever you want. If, for example, you want to boycott GlaxoSmithKlein after hearing about their exploitative and illegal vaccine tests that killed 14 babies – you could add them to your ‘boycott list’. Don’t like Coca-Cola for any of their irresponsible acts – add them to the list.

In a world where mobile app’s seem to be the domain of marketers – it is refreshing to see mobile technology being used by activists  to empower consumers and help hold corporations accountable.

Ideally this tool should become opensource so that any activists  or consumers can create their own unique database of companies to use with the app. Campaigning groups could make lists for supporters to upload to the boycott app. It could even be used to discover things about products when in a store – e.g. this cereal manufacturer CEO kills baby seals or this fashion designer has links to the far right.

Barcode scanning is something that is set to become more popular among consumers. This app is the latest incarnation of a broader trend of  scanning technology. Amazon recently released a popular mobile ‘Price Check’ app that encourages consumers to scan products they come across in bricks and mortar stores and receive a discount if they buy the product online through the Amazon app.

You could argue that the time it takes to scan every item of a weekly supermarket shop would be a barrier. However, jump a year or so in the future and every item will contain a RFID (radio frequency identification) chip, which is a superior and more efficient method of identifying objects than a normal barcode.

Then the same kind of friction-less technology we are seeing with Facebook will be a part of our shopping experience. Put a product in your shopping basket and your phone will give you a little alert if it is to be boycotted. Check out this ubercool video on the RFID future of shopping to get what I mean.

Google+ seemed to take up the lions share of my predictions for 2012. It is the most interesting and promising social network out there. Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn all have their place, but Google+ is still surrounded by a suggestive veil of mystery. However – despite all my interest, I don’t actually use the service that much. So with a new year starting I thought I would dive in and see what pearls I can find.

Starting Over

A point raised by Ezra Klein over on Quora is that Google+ allows you a fresh  start. Furnished with all the skills you have picked up from four years of Facebook and two years of Twitter,  Google+ gives you the opportunity to ensure that people are correctly grouped and avoid any miscalculations you may have previously made.

Bookmarking

I used to be a massive fan of social bookmarking and I used to religiously save all the interesting links I found to Delicious. This changed this year for reasons that escape me. I think it was a combination of a forgotten password, a broken plugin or fears that Delicious was to close that stopped me bookmarking everything. However Google+ looks set to bring me back into good bookmarking habits.

The G+ button that you see at the top of webpages and next to search results act as a one click bookmarking function that saves the page you are viewing to your public or private +1 page (here’s mine).

The problems are that you cannot tag links like you could in Delicious and you cannot currently perform searches on your list of +1’s. I imagine this will all be changed soon, and you will be able to search your +1 bookmarks from the Google homepage. After all, Google intends your +1 page to be ‘the place you’ll go to personally manage the ever-expanding record of things you love around the web‘.

Subscribing

Every so often I need to give my Google RSS reader a clean out. I am constantly following new websites and removing others from my feed. On Facebook – I am careful to follow only a few websites and brands in order to ensure my Facebook news feed doesn’t get clogged.

However, when I am subscribing using Google Circles I am instantly encouraged to categorize each subscription. I can have a tech news circle, a recipe circle and film circle. I can have a circle dedicated to particular thinkers and a circle for particular colleagues. And – I can drop people and websites in and out of circles with ease.

You could argue that this is not much different to Twitter lists. Yet things seem easier and more integrated with Google than it does with Twitter.  It is also easier to have longer and sustained conversations around a post than is possible with Twitter’s 140 character limit. The Google+ feed is also more visual and exciting than with other social networks.

Connecting

Google are search – so it makes sense that searching for people on Google+ should be perfect. There is already a directory that has indexed over 31 million users called FindPeopleonPlus which allows you to restrict a search by the profile information logged by Google. This kind of people search is something lacking in Twitter.

The Google+ profile is also something that will become increasingly important. Unlike Twitter which restricts you to 140 characters – Google lets you create a full profile that will act as your shop window to all of your Google activity.

In conclusion

Google+ is going to be the most public of your social network profiles. It will be fully indexed and come up early on Google search. It is also going to serve as an infrastructure behind all of Google’s applications. It is also going to radically redefine what it means to search the internet – as my next post on the world of social search will explore

The last few years have seen the adoption of social networking increase rapidly. From Facebook to Twitter,  LinkedIn to Flickr – there is a social network for just about anything.

As the revolution of social networking continues unabated, there comes a growing need to explore patterns within the networks – a process called social network analysis (SNA)

Previously, the world of social network analysis could only be accessed with a bit of computing knowledge. However, an open source programme called Nodexl has changed that by bringing some of the important metrics used to understand a network, and the ability to create impressive network graphs, into Excel.

Nodexl makes understanding a social network graph easy for anyone who can navigate around a spreadsheet. Excel is often where the world of computer programmers and the rest of us can meet up and speak the same language. Nodexl also makes it easy to import data from existing social networks such as Twitter, Flickr and Youtube

The people that can begin to make use of network graphs range from marketers to activists – and I imagine they are now a staple of any well equipped social media political campaign. Using a social network graph you can (among other things):

  • Spot the trusted influencers in a network
  • Find the important people that act as bridges between groups
  • Uncover isolated people and groups
  • Find the people who seem good at connecting a group
  • Plot who is at the centre and who is at the periphery of a network
  • Work out the where the weakest points of a network are
  • Assess who is best placed to replace a network admin
There are two basic components of a social graph:
  • Node: In a social network a node will usually represent a single person – but it can also represent an event, hashtag etc
  • Edge: A connection/interaction between two nodes – such as a friendship in Facebook, a follow on Twitter or an attendance at an event or Twitter Hashtag.

One major question that a social network analysis asks is how connected nodes (or people) are. But what determines how connected any person is? What metrics can be used to work it out how influential or powerful any individual player is?

These are some of the major metrics used in Nodexl – and they offer a good way to start thinking about your own networks:

  • Centrality – A key term which refers to how ‘in the middle’ a node is in a network.
  • Degree centrality – a count of the number of nodes a node is connected to. This could be the number of people that follow you on Twitter, or the amount of people that viewed a YouTube video. It is important to remember that a high degree score isn’t necessarily the most important factor in measuring a nodes importance.
  • In Degree and Out Degree – A connection between two nodes can be undirected (we are mutual friends on Facebook) or directed (you follow someone on Twitter that doesn’t follow you back). The In-Degree refers to the number of inbound connections, and Out-Degree refers to the number of outbound connections.
  • Geodesic distances – A geodesic distance is the shortest possible distance between two nodes  (popularly known as the degree of separation). In social network analysis, a nodes shortest and longest geodesic distance is recorded (the longest possible distance between a node and another is sometimes refered to as its eccentricity and can be used to work out the diameter of a network). An average geodesic distance of an entire network is worked out to assess how close community members are to each other.
  • Closeness centrality – This metric determines how well connected a node is in the overall network. It takes into account a nodes geodesic distance from all other nodes. Using this metric you can find people that don’t have strong connections.
  • Betweenness centrality – A score of how often a node is on the shortest path between two other nodes. This can be thought of as a bridge score – how important a node is at bridging other connections. People with a high betweenness centrality are often known as key players. A node could only have a degree centrality of 2, but if those two connections bridge to large unconnected groups, then that node will have a high betweenness centrality.
  • Eigenvector centrality – This looks at how well connected the people you are connected to are. It scores how much of a network a node can reach in comparison to the same amount of effort enacted by every other node in the network.

I am going to be exploring social network analysis over the next few weeks and blogging what I find here – if you want to follow along make sure you follow me on twitter or subscribe for updates.

With so much content out on the web, the need for curators has never been stronger. Fortunately, a new category of software has emerged to help make the process of curating information easy and fun. Here is part one of my list of some of the best new curation tools out there:

Scoop.it

This website lets you create a magazine like page with content.

You log in, think of a topic, grab your url (www.scoop.it/example) and begin adding article you find using your browsers ‘Scoop’ button.

The website does all the work of making the page look nice, but you can customize the style if you wish.

And, if you looking for help finding content,  Scoop It will give you a list of recommendations for your topic from around the web.

It has all the social media plugin’s you need, a daily email update on both your topic and other topics you follow and an easy way to explore new topics.

Check mine out here about the war on drugs, or this good one on new web tools.

Storify

Storify lets you gather content from a variety of social media platforms and order (and reorder) it all into a single stream.

It is an ideal platform for following a Twitter conversation and quickly pulling out good tweets, adding some comments, and slotting in any relevant media. It is also offers to send a notification to anyone mentioned in the Storify project.

Because of it’s ease of use and clever design, Storify is seeing vast adoption across the web. Popular website ReadWriteWeb use Storify to curate answer to their regular ‘Big Question’ from across Facebook, Twitter and their own comments section. It is also the ideal way to curate an event that has a strong Twitter engagement.

Pearl Tree’s

A Pearl Tree is an attractive and elegant way to display the relations between webpages of content. 

A pearl is an item of web content (YouTube video, webpage etc) which you link to other pearls which contain similar content to create a pearltree.

It’s ideal application would be as a visual guide to a topic, taking people through different networks of thought. For example – this pearltree explores the concept of the virtual currency of BitCoin.

Projeqt

Projeqt seems to be a very polished and stylish way of curating content. It’s functionality is quite basic and works in a similar way to a Powerpoint presentation.

You arrange your content (videos, pictures, text, RSS, Twitter) onto a series of slides and let the user glide through the story.

This platform would be ideal for showcasing a series of pictures with short comments in between. For a good example of the possibilities, check out this example by Brain Pickings.

Pinterest

Pinterest dubs itself as an online pinboard. You pin things you find to your own virtual pinboard page and find other people to connect to with similar interests.

The layout is both simple and appealing. It looks suitable for visual based curation and has seen early adoption within the craft and art worlds.

Promotionally, Pinterest is aimed at the casual user, and not so much the professional curator. Uses include planning a wedding, redecorating your home and sharing recipes.

Redux

I’ve been looking for a service like this for a while! Redux is a curation tool for video. Create your own channel and curate videos around your theme.

The user experience is pretty sleek. After clicking on a channel you are taken straight through to a full screen video with controls to move on to the next one or pause.

As a curator, you can add videos to pre-existing channels or create a channel of your own. The screen for curators isn’t quite as stylish as the viewer screen, but functional enough.

In such a short space of time, technology and the internet has spread into previously unimaginable areas. But where next?

I found this list over at the TED conversation page from a guy called Christophe Cop.

* Social control networks
* Community to virtual countries with parallel tax and income systems
* verbal interaction with pc
* A complete documented systems of virtual layers worldwide, with virtual objects &c.
* Deep democracy systems
* Open data (& visualisation) everywhere
* Brain connections with the cloud
* Rewiring and re-shaping of the real-world with those tools
* Meeting places where groups of people go online together (instead of individuals coming together online)
* AI- life coach
* Biomonitoring
* More sensors connected to the cloud
* (free), open and smart integrating and commutating systems for everybody to use according to personal needs and demands.
* more Alternate reality games (like Urgent Evoke, but improved)
* personal virtual aura’s

Geminoid is by far the most human looking android I have seen. From a still image it is pretty much impossible to tell that this is actually a robot. In the video below it becomes easier to identify this as a robot, but it could equally be an actor performing a robot. Amazing.